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Dental Care Too Expensive – Wrong – Get a Dental Savings Plan!

www.dentalplans.com/lp-ppc/gd-right-way-to-save?&affid=325618&utm_medium=cpc&utm_source=google&utm_campaign=Discovery+-+Remarketing&utm_group=&utm_term=&utm_content=&mkwid=abc123&keyword=&gclid=Cjw…
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Katy Perry reveals the unpleasant intimacy of Orlando Bloom – Code List

Katy Perry has granted an interview to the radio program ‘Heart Radio’ in which he would not hesitate to air the shame of Orlando Bloom after five years sharing day to day and having had a daughter in common, daisy dovealmost a year and a half ago.
The singer would have no problem getting into the privacy of his partner, coming to tell an episode that did not leave him in a very good place. Quite the contrary, because one of the habits of the actor who told was quite unpleasant.
Although Kate Perry was only trying to highlight the consequences of Orlando Bloom’s clueless character by taking it with humor, the truth is that she would bring to light some aspect, at least, little. hygienic. An example is the interpreter’s custom of leaving dental floss anywhere in the house.
“Oh my gosh, she loves brushing her teeth and I appreciate that because some couples don’t and I find it disgusting. He has shiny teeth. But leave the dental floss everywhere!”, the 37-year-old artist would reveal after explaining that she had come to find the fingerprint by Orlando Bloom in places as diverse as the bed, the car and even the kitchen table.
“I always tell him: ‘We have garbage cans everywhere!’” Kate Perry will add about the actor, who at 45 years old has an obvious problem with his oversights In the home.
Katy Perry reveals the unpleasant intimacy of Orlando Bloom – Code List codelist.biz/2022/05/26/katy-perry-reveals-the-unpleasant-intimacy-of-orlando-bloom/
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A tale of teeth: New Hampshire’s oral health problem | Local News | laconiadailysun.com

LACONIA — It costs nothing to smile, a common saying goes – but the cost of keeping the teeth behind that smile can sometimes be out of reach.
For low income residents, affordable dental care is extremely limited. Often, the only treatment they’re covered for is tooth extraction. On a large scale, poor dental health can lead to a cascade of corresponding health issues, and cost the economy as a whole. Thanks to the work of dental professionals around the state, new legislation is coming to confront this problem.
“When I came here, I thought that I was living in a parallel universe because I had not seen such teeth,” said Olga Minukhin, who has practiced dentistry in Laconia for 18 years. “If you come to Gilford you will not see the same picture, or Wolfeboro. Here in Laconia or Franklin especially, it’s totally low income, a lot of drug addiction.”
Just over 11% of Laconia lives in poverty according to the 2020 census, and the median household income is $55,000, about $12,000 below the U.S. national average. For low income residents, New Hampshire Medicaid is often the only affordable health care option. However, adults on Medicaid are severely limited when it comes to dental care.
“You can’t get a filling, cleaning, full exam, dentures, crowns, root canals, you can’t get anything done except get your teeth taken out,” said Dr. Kelly Perry, dental director at Mid-State Health Center. “It’s not a totally uncommon occurrence to be taking out all the teeth in someone in their 30s or 40s.”
In addition to the limited care provided by medicaid, many dentists and oral surgeons won’t take Medicaid patients.
“One, is it is very low reimbursement, and two, lots of no shows. The patients just don’t show. You do need to maintain your practice, and pay your bills, you just cannot do that,” Minukhin explained, saying that there are some oral surgeons that do take Medicaid patients, but they are far and few between. “The oral surgeons now have only two places who are accepting Medicaid patients. It’s Dartmouth-Hitchcock, and Elliot Hospital near Manchester and the waiting list is five to eight months.”
The way that the United States and insurance companies compartmentalize oral health has also contributed to the Lakes Region’s poor oral health, according to Perry.
“No health insurance comes with your dental coverage. Not only are you paying potentially a deductible, you’re also paying a percentage of the total fee, and you’re also hit with a pretty low maximum for a year. That amount hasn’t gone up in decades so as costs go up, the amount that people are insured for has stayed around $1,500 to $2,000,” Perry explained. “It’s almost a ridiculous notion that we have to discuss why oral health is important to systemic health.”
A third prong of the dental disaster is a culture of poor diet and ignorance of basic oral health practices.
“Nobody told them teeth should be brushed, nobody told them, don’t drink soda. The biggest problem is that people drink sugar like there is no tomorrow and it’s the biggest contribution to the loss of teeth, plus drugs,” Minukhin said, recalling one of her earlier pediatric patients. “In 2004, a family comes in, they bring a six-year-old child. There is no teeth. Everything was black. I start this story saying, ‘well, no soda,’ mom looks at the six-year-old child and says ‘see?! I told you not to drink soda!’ I said, ‘okay, but who’s buying it?’”
“When you have generations of people without access to care because they can’t afford it or not enough providers or appointments, or no insurance, that’s just going to push oral health down the list of things they prioritize,” Perry said, stating that many patients “accept defeat” when it comes to having their teeth removed. “The next generation is taught that teeth are expendable.”
One of the best tools to change the culture may be education.
“We operate a school program here we have two certified public health dental hygienists that go to schools to provide services for k through 12 students,” Perry said. “They’re doing preventative services but also trying to educate. We hand out toothbrushes, toothpaste, give them the tools to do it, and hopefully that will start to change the culture of why teeth are important.”
Poor adult dental health can wreak havoc on the economy via emergency room visits, increased health care costs, loss of productivity, and even create barriers to employment.
“There’s no way a 35-year-old without teeth will have the same job prospects,” Perry explained. “If you’re a younger person or older person and you’re missing teeth in the aesthetic zone that’s going to make all kinds of social things tough. You’ll have difficultly building family, finding partners and jobs.”
As oral health deteriorates, Perry argued, it can compound and start a vicious social cycle.
“All these things are cyclical. Being in pain, being embarrassed can lead to depression, anxiety, substance use disorders, and those same things are going to come back and cause worsening oral health,” Perry said.
In addition to her current work, Perry is also the dental chair of the New Hampshire Oral Health Coalition. The group and other oral health care professionals have spent years educating law makers, and it looks like their efforts might be paying off. HB103 and SB 422, a pair of bills advocating for adding more dental benefits under the state Medicaid program are gaining bipartisan support.
“It makes a great deal of sense in terms of cost benefit to provide a Medicaid benefit for many, if not all of the dental functions and care that many of us have and Medicaid recipients do not,” said New Hampshire District 2 Senator Bob Giuda. “It will help them as far as jobs, health short and long term, save money over the current paradigm which basically sends you to an ER.”
SB422 is titled as, “Establishing an adult dental benefit under the state Medicaid program,” and will utilize funds from the state’s $21 million dollar settlement with the Centene Corporation. Centene was forced to pay the sum last year, after the state found that company had inaccurately reported the costs of its pharmacy benefit services.
“Use of that data received from Centene resulted in at least a $2.4 million negative financial impact to the state during settlement period,” according to a press release from the Attorney General’s office.
SB 422’s copy states that “$2,420,203 will be used to meet the financial requirements of completing a Medicaid Care Management FY 2020 risk corridor calculation. In practice, these funds will be used to reimburse the federal government for over payments made to the state Medicaid program. The remaining $18,728,619 will be used to fund the non-federal share of the adult dental benefit. These funds shall be non-lapsing.”
As for the non-lapsing funds, Giuda reiterated that he and other law makers were in it for the long haul.
“The initial payments are covered by the Centene lawsuit payment,” Giuda explained. “We didn’t want to wait till the budget cycle. The budget writing next year will incorporate it into the state budget.”
Giuda expressed confidence that Gov. Sununu would sign SB 422 once it clears the Senate.
Should the bills pass, New Hampshire might see some better smiles over the next few years.
A tale of teeth: New Hampshire’s oral health problem | Local News | laconiadailysun.com www.laconiadailysun.com/news/local/a-tale-of-teeth-new-hampshires-oral-health-problem/article_d1251698-ca4c-11ec-be83-43a2936df0f6.html
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The Best Toothbrush Holder for 2022 | Yahoo! Life Reviews

Oral hygiene is an essential part of self-care. We are taught to brush and floss our teeth from a young age to keep cavities from forming. Keeping our teeth clean is vital for our health, and it is not possible without a good-quality, clean toothbrush.
To maintain our dental hygiene, we need to keep our dental essentials safe from germs, and a toothbrush holder is an ideal way to do that. A toothbrush holder is an excellent bathroom accessory that helps organize your hygiene products. It keeps toothbrushes upright, preventing them from touching dirty surfaces or other brush heads. With various options available, choosing the right product can become overwhelming, so we created this helpful guide. Here, we have reviewed some of the most praiseworthy toothbrush holders of 2022 to help you find the right one for your bathroom.
The Best Toothbrush Holder for 2022 | Yahoo! Life Reviews www.yahoo.com/now/toothbrush-holder-214730361.html
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Get a top-rated toothbrush with extra brush heads for $40 | Engadget

We only get two pairs of teeth in our lifetime, so you should take every possible measure to keep your pearly whites healthy. Upgrading to an electric toothbrush is an excellent first step. According to Cochrane, these devices are effective and reducing plaque and gingivitis. They may also benefit folks with mobility issues such as carpal tunnel and arthritis.
If you’re looking for an affordable, well-reviewed option to impress during your next dentist appointment, check out the AquaSonic Black Series Toothbrush, available now for $40. This kit comes with a convenient travel case and eight dupont brush heads to maintain your oral health on the go. And if you’re not in the market for a fancy new toothbrush, consider this: The Black Series holds an average customer rating of 4.6 out of five on Amazon with over 47,000 reviews.
Get a top-rated toothbrush with extra brush heads for $40 | Engadget www.engadget.com/aqua-sonic-black-series-toothbrush-deal-sale-145529566.html
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The 5 best electric toothbrushes of 2022 | ZDNet

What is the best electric toothbrush? The Oral-B Pro 1000 is ZDNet’s top choice. We compared features like pricing, moving type, and brush heads to determine the best electric toothbrush as well as some other honorable mentions. But finding the right electric toothbrush for you means considering how you want a toothbrush to fit into your busy life.
The 5 best electric toothbrushes of 2022 | ZDNet www.zdnet.com/home-and-office/kitchen-household/best-electric-toothbrush/
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Taking care of a precious asset: your smile – Ruetir

Mouth health is first of all prevention
Parents know this well: taking care of their children’s oral hygiene, but also their own, is not only a matter of health but also of home economics. Care for the good condition of the mouth and teeth can have an important impact on the economic balance of a family and oral health is undoubtedly one of the most burdensome “outgoing” items.
If the saying “prevention is better than cure” is certainly applicable to every aspect of the care of one’s body, in dentistry this becomes indispensable. In fact, correct and daily oral hygiene, constant care of one’s mouth and periodic checks at structures managed by professionals are essential, for an in-depth evaluation of the oral cavity and the identification of an individual plan designed on the needs of the individual.
For a few weeks, those who live in the capital have had the Vigne Nuove clinic in Korian at their disposal. An excellent structure that makes prevention its true ‘mission’ and offers a dental service with modern equipment and expert professionals.
Taking care of a precious asset: your smile – Ruetir www.ruetir.com/2022/05/26/taking-care-of-a-precious-asset-your-smile/
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Here’s Why It Is Important To Regularly Change Your Toothbrush

Here’s Why It Is Important To Regularly Change Your Toothbrush
Almost every person in the world checks the expiry date of any item before buying it and especially when it is a food item. Expiry date refers to the date after which the product becomes unusable. Consuming it after this date can be risky. Not only do we check the expiry date, but the manufacturing date as well and the conditions in which the product is being kept. But have you ever seen the expiry date of the toothbrush which we put inside our mouth every day to clean our teeth?
We often buy a toothbrush from the market and use it until its bristles are completely damaged. Or we buy one if we forget our toothbrush at home while traveling somewhere. According to experts, we should change the toothbrush regularly before it reaches its wear and tear limit.
According to dentists at Furumoto Dentistry, Dental Bar, California, a person should replace their toothbrush every three months. However, that doesn’t include the packaged duration of the toothbrush. Packaged toothbrushes do not have an expiry date. But as soon as you open it and start using it, the life cycle of your toothbrush is 3 to 4 months. After this, it is a waste to clean your teeth with that toothbrush.
According to experts, there are many disadvantages of using an expired toothbrush. If you use a toothbrush for more than four months, it means:
· Too much bacteria growth on your brush is doing you no good by cleaning your teeth with it.
· That toothbrush is no longer able to remove the plaque deposited on your teeth. The more wear and tear your brush goes through, the more incapable it is of removing plaque.
· You will start having problems of bad breath since your brush is unable to clean the plaque.
The toothbrush you are using also gives you signals that you need to replace it. The bristles of the brush are spread and there are black marks under it. It’s a sign to change your brush.
www.msn.com/en-in/lifestyle/family/here-s-why-it-is-important-to-regularly-change-your-toothbrush/ar-AAXyYW1?ocid=BingNewsSearch
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Should You Pet Your Cat With a Toothbrush? Experts Debunk Viral Posts

Should You Pet Your Cat With a Toothbrush? Experts Debunk Viral Posts
“If you get a wet toothbrush and pet a cat with it, it supposedly reminds them” of their mother grooming them when they were a kitten.
This claim has been doing the rounds online and recently went viral thanks to videos posted on Reddit and TikTok. In both cases, the footage shows a cat being massaged on their head and face with a toothbrush—and apparently becoming “emotional,” almost as though the brush had brought back childhood memories.
So, is there any truth in the notion that the bristles evoke remembrances that will calm your cat? Should you be rushing to the supermarket to buy a spare toothbrush for your pet?
What’s the Medical Evidence? Zazie Todd, a cat behavior expert and author of Purr: The Science of Making Your Cat Happy, said it was an interesting idea, but she didn’t “know of any evidence for that.”
She told Newsweek: “Cats are used to us petting them with our hands and some cats may feel stressed and react badly if we change what we do.”
Dr Christian Broadhurst, a senior veterinarian at the Clay Humane non-profit clinic in Orange Park, Florida, also said there was no medical evidence to support the idea, but added that most cats like being brushed anyway.
“I could see very young kittens responding well to that, because that’s where they would be most in need of their mother’s care. If you had an abandoned kitten that you’re trying to raise, that would probably be very soothing and very comforting for them.
“Whether they think it’s actually their mother, we don’t know. There’s no evidence of that,” he told Newsweek.
When to Pet or Brush Your Cat Any alterations in your cats’ routine can affect their mood and increase anxiety levels. They also love to have their space and be in control of the situation, so check they’re OK with being petted before you do it.
“We should always give cats a choice of whether or not to be petted,” Todd said, explaining that the best way to “ask for their permission” is to get down to their level and put a hand or finger out and see if they approach it and rub against it.
“If they do, then it’s likely they will enjoy a few pets, but if they don’t then it’s their choice.”
The way a cat reacts to human attention in general depends on their personality and the context. There are no set rules and what they liked a few minutes earlier might not feel appropriate later.
For this reason, Todd recommends not petting them for too long. “Keep petting sessions short. You can do a consent test by taking a pause and see what the cat does. If they want more petting, they will make it pretty obvious.”
Where to Pet or Brush Your Cat Many cats like being petted near the head and face, “where the scent glands are,” according to Todd. This can vary too, however. “Since every cat is an individual, it’s important to pay attention to their body language to see what their personal preferences are.”
Broadhurst said many cats also like being brushed on the shoulders and mid back. He advised against brushing close to the base of the tail or on their abdomens.
“Keep it to the head, shoulders and the first half of the back. You can maybe pet with your hand the rest of the way down but don’t use bristles. Further down it can be very irritating to the sensitive skin on the base of their back.”
Which Kind of Brush Is Best? Some cats do seem to like being stroked with a wet toothbrush, judging from the number of social media clips that show people trying the “hack” on their pet.
However, most cats prefer a very fine wire bristle brush, according to Broadhurst. “If you brush them gently with that, it really does get out a lot of the undercoat and they really do seem to enjoy it. So, that tends to be my preference—as well as some thick bristle brushes and plastic bristle brushes.”
Whether or not brushing hurts your cat depends more on your technique, he added.
“You’ll be able to read your cat. If you’re brushing your cat and it starts trying to get away from you, you’re probably brushing too hard, or your cat doesn’t like being brushed. If your cat comes over and you’re brushing and falls over on her side so you can brush her side better, that’s a good sign that she’s enjoying it and you’re doing it right.”
With all the whiskers and sensory organs located on their faces, you might not want to use the wire bristles there. “That might be somewhere you’d want to use a softer brush, maybe more like a hairbrush style.”
www.newsweek.com/pet-cat-toothbrush-experts-debunk-viral-post-1701846
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How to choose a toothbrush and when to throw it out

How to choose a toothbrush and when to throw it out
The toothbrush is the most basic tool for maintaining healthy teeth, but many people give their toothbrush little thought and don’t know when to swap it out for a new one. It can also be difficult to choose what type of brush to use: manual or electric, hard or soft bristles. To answer these common questions, here is some advice from a pro—assistant professor Jane Cotter of the Caruth School of Dental Hygiene at the Texas A&M University College of Dentistry.
How often should a toothbrush be replaced?
Often, people latch on to one favorite toothbrush and use it until it’s completely worn out. But Cotter said you need to replace it more often than you might think.
“The American Dental Association recommends that toothbrushes need to be replaced every three months,” she said. “Toothbrushes used longer than three months can become frayed and may damage the gingiva (gums).”
Cotter says the three-month timeline applies to both manual and electric toothbrush heads, but sometimes brushes have to be replaced earlier.
“If the bristles of the toothbrush are fraying or are spreading out, then the brush needs to be replaced,” she said. “Some toothbrushes have bristles that change color over time to help patients know when they need replacing.”
According to Cotter, toothbrushes and toothbrush heads should also be replaced if someone has been sick. Viruses, including cold, flu and the coronavirus, thrive in a moist environment and can spread through physical contact. While sick, socially distance your toothbrush—don’t share a common toothbrush holder with others.
“It is important to store your toothbrush in a vertical, upright position in the open air so that it will dry out between uses,” Cotter said. “This helps control bacterial and fungal growth on the bristles.”
What is the best toothbrush to use?
“Research has consistently shown that electric toothbrushes clean better than manual toothbrushes,” Cotter said. “Most electric toothbrushes have a two-minute timer that beeps or pulses every 30 seconds to alert the user to move to a different quadrant or area of the mouth. Some of the new toothbrushes also have an app that will show the user where they are missing when brushing.”
Some individuals prefer a hard-bristled toothbrush to clean teeth, but dental professionals don’t typically recommend them. Firm or hard toothbrushes can actually damage the tooth enamel, Cotter says, so it is better to go with a soft bristle toothbrush.
At the end of the day, understanding what toothbrush to use and following proper toothbrush maintenance will help keep those pearly whites healthy.

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